About your Search

20121006
20121014
SHOW
Today 17
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 55
FBC 37
SFGTV 33
CNN 32
CNNW 32
FOXNEWS 32
KGO (ABC) 28
KPIX (CBS) 28
CSPAN 27
KTVU (FOX) 26
CSPAN2 21
KNTV (NBC) 21
MSNBC 21
MSNBCW 21
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 16
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 589
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)
, we strengthened the law, through a local ordinance. so this is not really anything new. this has been on the books for quite some time. the other thing i wanted to add is that even if there were no tobacco product being used in the hukas -- and i do believe that having the tobacco products there, open in a container, it would seem that it would be very likely that the customers would put the huka tobacco product on the hot stones if there are huka pipes present. that this is sort of similar to the phenomenon of electronic cigarettes, which now were recently banned by the airport commission and they're banned on airplanes. and this is even though there's no tobacco that is used in electronic cigarettes, the problem is that it gives the public the impression that smoking is permitted in areas where it's not permitted, and it also gives the impression to the public that there's no consequence to smoking in areas where smoking is not permitted. tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable deaths in the united states, and the two major factors that have reduced smoking in san franc
as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
practice. the laws in this area are strict compliance laws, and they are very specific. the federal law since 1990 indicates issues from 1998. all businesses, such as a grocery store, a dentist's office, restaurants, a doctor's office, virtually anything that a member of the public comes into the -- comes into needs to be a barrier-free. we will go over what barriers are. every public accommodation needs to be wheelchair-accessible. there are also other other forf disability. most of the issues we are hearing about are wheelchair accessibility issues. there is a small group of private individuals who are wheelchair-down that go around the city and they look at small businesses. and i dare say anybody in small restaurants have some accessibility issues. it is another attempt at making your building wheelchair accessible. i am not sure which of you may be merchants and which it may be landlords. the law applies to both. and that means you were 100% liable for any barriers to access and any damages that may be associated with those barriers. there are ways you can defend yourself. with yo
that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think
bright pink clothing, i am happy to announce that my son and daughter-in-law are expecting a boy in march; my granddaughter will have a little brother. finally more importantly, i did meet with project sponsor a couple of weeks ago in regards to 2830 toledo, i did have a chance to look at the plans and i'm happy to work with the dr requester and project sponsor to forge a compromise that will make it something that the commission can evaluate and find compromise. this will come back in november. i think there's a lot of potential there. >> congratulations. another line of antoninis in san francisco. commissioner woo. >> i want to announce that this saturday is affordable housing day in san francisco. there will be a number of tours. affordable, seniors, partnership between aia and the number of affordable housing developers.anyone that wants to stop by feel free. >> we can move onto directors reports. directors announcements and review of the board of supervisors, board of appeals in historic preservation commission. >> good afternoon. a couple of quick announcements. it
that some future mayor will be -- not by the rule of law but the temptation to remove a political adversary. removing an elected while not in office iscq.c4 not justice. if any case cry out for a bright line rule, for a clear and unambiguous application for the law to the fact it is this case. i will turn it over to shepherd kopp. thank you. >> president chiu: will remind members of the public, the first rule of this chamber is for members of the public not to express either applause or other statements. thank you. mr. kopp. >> thank you. good afternoon, members of the board, president. i'm shepherd kopp and along with mr. wagner i've been representing sheriff ross mirkarimi during these proargs. i want to discuss why we strongly believe that we don't need to draw from other jurisdictions as the mayor has, in order to arrive at a definition of official misconduct, that works in san francisco, and that is workable. and that has been tested. and the reason that we have come back time and again to the case involving commissioner mazzola is because, in that case, we saw board of supervisors sit
law and theory as to freedom of action versus freedom of choice, i think it it actually is quite compatible across both if we simply separate what it is we're talking about, a difference between your preferences and desires over which you may not have control versus action choices and in law, we punish you for bad actions, not for bad preferences and desires. so then the question is, how do we take account for preferences and desires that may be outside of your control? that may be things like gray matter lighten kent showed us that showed us that people like psychopaths have decreased gray matter in particular regions of their brain. it could be something like the guy who he was talking about out of virginia who had the large tumor in his brain and chose to act on but didn't have control over having the tumor in his brain. how do we take account for that in law? that's, i think, the interesting struggle that neuroscience presents us with, but it doesn't change the issue of free will. in fact, we have just as robust of evidence from neuroscience that supports this concept of acti
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to dat
their charges, a law enforcement official, or a public official could rob banks on their way to their inauguration, and there's nothing that anybody could do about it. well, there's a couple of points that i'd like to make about that. number one is the charter of san francisco, while an admirable document, is not perfect. in fact, there's no provision in the charter that permits anyone to remove the mayor for official misconduct. the only way a mayor can be removed is by recall, or defeat in the next election. so the mayor could commit a first degree murder, and not be removable, unless the voters decide to take matters into their own hand and remove him. the mayor has also made the argument that this removal provision,ka@u 15.105, is a valuable, speedy and effective tool. and they want you to do the work, that the voters might have to do if they were to decide to launch a recall election. well the voters have decided to launch a recall election, thateÑ issue would be decided next month. so their argument that this is procedure is not borne out byk5p the facts and the length
to suspend the sheriff was without basis in the law and why you must ultimately reinstate the sheriff. ross mirkarimi campaigned on the power of redemption. he's been a key proponent of restorative justice in this city. but there is no question that on december 31st, 2011, ross mirkarimi made a serious and terrible mistake. and how did he deal with that mistake? he immediately apologized to his wife. he entered into counseling. he apologized to the people of san francisco. he pled guilty to a criminal offense. all of that underscores the responsibility that rossq]j terrible mistake that he made on new year's eve last year. and as a result of that mistake, several months from his wife and son. he was suspended without pay, with no means to provide for hi family. his entire life's work was destroyed almost in an instant. he's beenwácf described by the r and the mayor's attorneys with the most inflammatory and prejudicial rhetoric, yet at the end of the day, the punishment does not fit theyxúw crime. this afternoon, i'm going to spend a fe7%g minutes telling u about why this case is differ
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
on together but he proactively came for this bill, s.b. 1506, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that f
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences and his desires and early
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
? >> no. if you take a look at the gun laws we have, i don't even think president obama is proposing more gun laws. we have to make sure we enforce our laws. we have laws that aren't being properly enforced. but the best thing to help prevent violent crime in inner cities is to bring opportunity in inner cities. is to help teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and churches do to help one another make sure they can realize the value in one another. >> you can do that by cutting taxes? >> those are your words, not mine. >> thank you very much, sir. >> that was kind of strange. trying to stuff words in people's mouths? >> it it sounds like you're -- >> ryan folks putting the paper in front of the camera and everything. vice presidential nominee paul ryan getting annoyed in this interview with terry camp in flint, michigan. the campaign even after the interview was over still went out of their way to trash the reporter that paul ryan walked out of that interview on. the campaign given on the record quotes calling
in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be better off in prison than not being in prison? those types
to the domestic workers i am an attorney who helps workers, and enforce their rights on the federal and state law and i think that it is important that those rights be respected. he posed the question to the authors of that law in vetoing it as to what is the impact going to be on some of the elderly and the sick who rely on home care workers in particular, and i guess the governor, a democrat found that legislation to be too broad, too enerous and em posing more requirements on the small businesses than was necessary and asked that a more tailored and more appropriate set of legislation come back to him on that subject and i would agree with that. >> mr. leno. >> i supported both of those bills with regard to the domestic workers' rights bill. we heard so many horror stories in the committee hearings. if you could imagine being in the employment and not being able to take the kinds of breaks for meals and for rest, even to have an 8-hour workday, it is a different kind of employment, so it is not as easily tailored to the kind of worker protection rights that we expect in every other industry. s
in the town hall audience. randi? >> paul, thank you very much. >>> there are new voters i.d. laws in place now in several states. we'll look at their potential impact on the election process. >>> if you are leaving the house right now. you continue watching cnn from your mobile phone. take us with you. just go to cnn.com/tv. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> there are just 24 days left until election day, but still there's some confusion over the actual process. new voter i.d. laws in several states have changed the rules, while other states have seen their laws knocked down or delayed by the courts. so we are focusing on those voter i.d. laws this morning. right now we are focusing on florida. joining me now is florida conservative talk show host bernie thompson. i wanted to ask you -- good morning to you, first of all. >> good morning. >> i want
in battleground states about who gets to vote and how. all morning with we are putting the voter i.d. laws in focus. gang member or home grown terrorist. that is the question in one case. legal editor paul callan breaks it down. >> that is a bunk of malarky. >> debate politics and the eu has a nobel peace prize. we will look at the week that was. turn an entrepreneur's drea. ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] see life in the best light. [music] transitions® lenses automat
panels and between the patient and doctor. that is something i do not agree with in our health-care law. that's one of the reasons i oppose it. these are times we have to look at what is best for everyone to have the best kind of health care they can have. i believe in preventive health care and let me just address one thing before -- let me digress for a second. i have never said i'm for privatizing social security or our medicare plans. that's clearly not my thing. congressman murphy knows that has to be honest about that. i will support continuing reform to social security and medicare simply prolong it for our generation. congressman murphy voted to take $716 billion of medicare to fund the affordable health care act. i don't think that is what we should do. we're there for than going to eventually did i those services to our seniors or hospitals or doctors who are going to take medicare patients. . it is being taken out of the pockets of drug industries and drug companies who are making billions of care for seniors. if you are going to be serious about reducing the rate of growth o
including community leader sam ladder. after graduating from u.c. berkeley and hastings law school, bob joined a family firm and became active in numerous civic organizations, particularly within the jewish community as well as on our san francisco human rights commission. he also had a love of politics and successfully ran the mccarthy campaign for the board of supervisors. and i know that he will be missed dearly by the community and his family. my third in memoriam is for gary cray who is known by many in the telegraph hill community, my district, as the filbert steps gardner. gary tended to the gardens of the filbert steps, which is one of our city's great hidden treasures for more than three decades. and he took care of the sprawling garden as a volunteer. it was truly a labor of love for him and he was never paid a dime for t. he worked his hearts -- poured his heart into his work to create a clean, green and serene space that many in my neighborhood and throughout the city have grown to love and appreciate. in addition to caring for gardens, he was also someone who was dedicated
for over 20 years. >> a good attorney and, perhaps as important, very good at the business of law. larry's longtime friend fred atchison. >> he could open 50 files a month in personal injury litigation, which made him a rich man. >> but nobody's perfect, of course. and for all of larry's unquestioned talents, the man carried around with him a raft of corresponding demons. >> i know he had a difficult childhood and that a lot of your personality is shaped when you're a child. >> and, as an adult, larry struggled with alcohol and women. he married and divorced several times. >> it was like a void he was trying to fill, and he never could fill it. >> in fact, from time to time larry had gone on benders and just vanished weeks at a time. and everybody would worry and wonder, and sure enough he'd show up again. >> i had a t-shirt made up once, yellow with black letters, saying "where is larry mcnabney". >> but then finally larry, well into his 40s, seemed to get his act together for real. he set up a new office in las vegas, everything clicked, possibly for an attractive of reason, as tavia d
would do something like this. >> cnn legal contributor paul cowl lan says alabama law may come into play in this case down the road. >> alabama also has virtually the identical stand your ground law that florida has. so do you know that the officer in this case can probably say he was -- he felt that he was in danger of his life, and he was standing his ground and shooting? so i'm betting as this proceeds you may see that law that we've heard so much back in the case in florida rear it's ugly head now in alabama. >> the officer involved in the shooting has been put on administrative looeeave until t investigation is complete. >>> to pennsylvania where the state's deputy attorney general and his wife are accused of svrly abusing two children they adoptd. police arrested douglas and kristin barber after the kids had a doctor's visit. investigators say the doctor noticed several fractures on the 18-month-old girl's head and the 6-year-old boy up appeared starved. the couple faces charges of assault and child endangerment. their attorney has not commented. >>> all right. turning to internati
and will at the political level to enforce the law and appears that we need state level support as well. >> thank you, so this is a big picture question. miss dillon. >> what do you think that the legislature can do to address the systemic problems with the finances. >> that is a big picture question, it is a tough question. i think that in the long term a lot of the problems that we have here in the budget relate to the ease at which citizens can put ballot box budgeting measure into his our state rule books and they don't sunset and the legislature has increasing little control as well as the government what can and cannot be cut every year. this is a problem that is not caused by democrats or republicans or the structure of our system. that is one thing that i would try to change is have legislation passed that would allow any such provisions that are sponsored by citizens and maybe even provisions that are sponsored by legislatures such as a senator to sunset or be examined regularly by some type of a commission. as to whether they remain valid. that is the big picture, but the other big thing that t
at the school of law since january 1986. she teaches and writes in the area of evidence, constitution law, and women in the law. professor has been named to the mesh law institute and recognized one of the texas top women lawyers. and i also would like to introduce ken lambrecht president and chief executive off of planted parenthood. they are the largest reproductive health care provider in the state and one of the largest in the nation. it's networking of health certainlies merge this fall and they now serve central and north texas including austin, dallas, forth worth, tyler, and waco. planted parenthood have -- each year. planned parenthood in 2005 and brings more than twenty years of leadership experience in the health care industry. finally that brings us our keynote speaker tonight. most of us remember the moment that sandra she testified about seven months ago on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover con stray seption. the remarks through the radio talk show host rush limbaugh who called her names. but maybe that isn't -- what isn't well known is that mrs. fluke dev
or not to abolish the death penalty, and if the state's three strikes law should be reform reformed. the controversy continues over san francisco sheriff ross mirkarimi's future even after he's reinstated by the board of supervisors. >>> plus writer lynn povich and her husband, steve shepard on journalism's transition to the digital age, coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm belva davis and welcome to this week in northern california. joining me on our news panel tonight are barbara taylor, kcbs city hall reporter and scott shafer, host of the california report on kqed public radio. and carla marinucci, san francisco chronicle senior political writer. carla, there is so much going on in politics today. let's start with the vice presidential debate. people said they wanted action. what did they get? >> that's right. you could almost hear the cheers coming out of san francisco, the bars and so forth as it was going on this week. a slugfest, a political slugfest. this is what the democrats wanted to see. if joe biden had one job at this event, it was to pump up the base. he did that job this week after
to the county. >> reporter: but now they are trumped by a new state law. besides lobbying by the environmentist groups. >> i spent two and a half weeks trying to walk on every legislative door. >> reporter: but governor brown, he signs san francisco assembly legislation that prohibits the local voters from restricting the importation of trash into a privately owned landfill. >> for me it is a huge disappointment to see the governor sign that there. >> reporter: and they feel like the other state is clearly telling them that the will of the people doesn't count. >> when the voters make a decision, about what is best in their community, i mean i think that we have as local government have a responsibility to do everything that we can to implement that in the best possible way. >> reporter: even though it was a local solano measure that assigned the law, but they say that the issue will go way beyond the county line if it was not passed. and the risk of every county and city almost across the state is having to manage their own garbage could become a reality, which would drive up cost, which would
morning, we are putting voter i.d. laws in focus. another teen tortured by bullies. after a desperate plea on youtube, we'll show you the drastic measure she took to escape. >>> and the long road home. space shuttle endeavor is on the move, cruising the streets of l.a. towards its final resting place. we'll take you there live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. 10:00 on the east coast. 7:00 a.m. on the west. let's start right there in los angeles with the shuttle endeavor. it has been on the move for most of the morning, but it still has a long way to go. a long way if you happen to be trying to move an 85-on the space shuttle. john zarrella is live with us watching it all go by. john, good morning. tell us just how slow is this thing actually going? >> reporter: well, i think it's funny because in orbit, it goes 17,500 miles an hour, and on the streets of los angeles, its top speed has been about 2 miles an hour. so this is certainly the slowest the shuttle has probably ever gone and it's one of shortest trips it's ever made, a total of 12 miles from l.a.x. where it left yesterd
the exploding debt, and at's health care law, same issues that help take the house back then. two key tea parties on same message will help republicans take senate back, americans for prosperity jenniffer sophano. >> if you didn't like the way that government was treating you as a citizen two years ago you must hate it now. 4 years of living under policies of barack obama have been devastating to americans, our families and our children's future, we have proof now, we're not talking about barack obama the man but the president and his policies could we are talking on the issues we can win on this. liz: katherina? >> you know the message still resonates, we need to remind people, people did not support obamacare before they passed, now that it is passed. we do not want it. and it the democrat party who single handedly are issuing largest tax hikes on middle class then we'll see in our life time. liz: talk about the new rasmussen survey with 54% of likely voters favors the repeal of the health care reform bill, what do you make of that? >> the number who want it repealed is low, if you look
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose of the bill is that it would help alleviate overcrowding in state prisons and county jails, and ease pressure on california's court system and result in millions of dollars in annual savings for both state and local governments. senator mark leno who couldn't join us today as been quoted as saying, quote, there's been no evidence to suggest long prison sentences deter or limit people from abusing drugs. in fact, time behind bars and felony records often have horrible, unintended consequences for people trying to overcome addiction because they are unlikely to receive drug treatment in prison and have few job prospects and educational opportunities when they leave. this legislation will help implement public safety realignment and protect our communities by reserving prison and jail space for more serious offenders. c
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 589 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)